Saturday, June 1, 2019

The Bookshop on the Corner by Jenny Colgan

Rating: 3 of 5 stars
Pages: 336 pages
Published: September 2016 

The Bookshop on the Corner by Jenny Colgan is a slow-paced novel set in the United Kingdom - mainly Scotland. This is a book that should be approached and read purely for entertainment. It's about Nina, a librarian, who recently is laid off due to a restructuring of her City. She steps way outside of her comfort zone, relocates, and starts her own mobile bookstore in a van. In a different place and with a new spin on her career as a literary matchmaker, she finds added excitement in her life.

I enjoyed the first two-thirds of this story. The writing is good, and the author paints a picture of an unsure young woman who branches out in a quaint little farm town. All of the secondary characters are interesting and add value to the development of the primary character, as she grows more sure of herself. However, the last third of the book seemed a little rushed like the author was unsure of how to wrap up the plot.

I struggled with a few other things in this book. The romantic element - I don't think it was needed. There was a lot of potential with Nina's character as well as her discovery of a new profession/business venture. I think the author could have fleshed that out more rather than introduce a slightly unrealistic romantic plot that seemed to rush to the end. Also, I didn't care for the way the author simply wrote off the Marek character. I found it insensitive. I know the book was published several years ago, but it's almost inflammatory considering immigration relations all over the world today. And finally, the title of the book bothered me because nowhere in the novel is there a bookshop on the corner. However, after reading through some Q&A on Goodreads, I learned that the more relevant U.K. title is Little Shop of Happily Ever After, which makes so much more sense. Why the title was changed for U.S. publication is beyond me.

Recommendation This is a light read for a summer weekend when you don't have anything important to do. There are some touching moments, but don't expect it to be the next Great American Read or anything. Just take it for what it is at face value.

Until next time ... Read on!

Regardless of whether I purchase a book, borrow a book, or receive a book in exchange for review, my ultimate goal is to be honest, fair, and constructive. I hope you've found this review helpful.

Sunday, May 26, 2019

When You Read This by Mary Adkins

Rating: 4.5 of 5 stars
Pages: 375 pages
Published: February 2019 

I may have mentioned this before, but I really do enjoy reading epistolary novels. I like getting a peek into others' correspondence and thought processes. So, when my fellow blogger friend offered this book up for review, I quickly put myself on the hold list for When You Read This, Mary Adkins' debut novel.

In short, this novel is about, Iris, a lady who dies of cancer like a lot of people do - way too young. The unique angle is she leaves behind a digital trail of blog and message board posts where she shares her journey of her illness leading up to her untimely death. As a dying wish of sorts, Iris leaves these writings behind for her boss, a public relations professional, Smith. (Yes, Smith is his first name.) Smith must work with Iris' sister Jade, who is reluctant to have the material compiled in book form.

This book is a quick read since it's all emails, text message chains, and digital postings. However, don't equate the quickness for weakness. The book tackles the heavy subject of death and the grief of those we leave behind. But it's not all darkness, I had several laugh-out-loud moments while reading this book. There were also points that made me reflect. In the end I appreciated the character growth illustrated through flawed but likable characters.

Recommendation I think this book is for anyone. It has a myriad of elements that would appeal to most any reader. The summer may be for light reading, but I think this book gives the reader a nice balance heavy and light material. This is a strong 4.5 out of 5 stars for me!

Until next time ... Read on!

Regardless of whether I purchase a book, borrow a book, or receive a book in exchange for review, my ultimate goal is to be honest, fair, and constructive. I hope you've found this review helpful.

Wednesday, May 22, 2019

My Life, My Love, My Legacy by Coretta Scott King





Rating: 5 of 5 stars
Narrators: Phylicia Rashad and January LaVoy
Length: 14:20:00
Published: June 2017 

In the midst of a reading slump, I solicited help via social media and was provided with several recommendations. The first I chose to take up was Mrs. Coretta Scott King's autobiography, My Life, My Love, My Legacy. This book was published in 2017, more than 10 years after her death. The book is a chronological story of her life as it was told to Dr. Barbara Reynolds.

For this re-telling, I selected the audiobook which was read first by January LaVoy then after Dr. Martin Luther King's assassination, was read by Phylicia Rashad of The Cosby Show fame. My biggest question was why the change in narrators. I think maybe the publisher wanted to give readers an audible signal that Mrs. King's life vastly changed after her husband's, her love's murder but that she continued to live a life full of charitable work and purpose.

And that is my biggest takeaway from this wonderful book. Mrs. Coretta Scott King was an activist in her own right. She was an educated and independent woman who was a loving daughter, mother, and wife. She was a fierce partner and confidant during her husband's very demanding and successful life. I truly enjoyed listening to the stories, many that I've heard growing up, from her perspective. It was also eye-opening just how much she did after that fateful day in April of 1968. Her strength through harassing and threatening phone calls, her patience with an often-traveled spouse who's work was never done, and her persistence and commitment to non-violence when there had been so much violence against her family. I appreciated how she shared private bits of her relationship with her children. I also enjoyed learning little facts about her that I never would have known, like her reason for never re-marrying and who funded her living quarters in the latter part of her life.

Dr. King is well known for his eloquent speaking and presentation skills. This book proves that Mrs. King was also a talented communicator. In this book, her prose is rhythmic and inspirational. I closed my listening app feeling satisfied as it ended with this:

For struggle is a never-ending process, and freedom is never really won. You earn it, and win it - in every generation. -Coretta Scott King

Recommendation: I absolutely recommend this book to anyone. It should resonate with any reader on a variety of levels as it activates a wide range of emotions. Mrs. King has left a long-lasting legacy that her children and grandchildren should be most proud of. I am thankful for the recommendation from Kara, and I hope my review is a way of paying it forward to another reader.

Until next time ... Read on!

Regardless of whether I purchase a book, borrow a book, or receive a book in exchange for review, my ultimate goal is to be honest, fair, and constructive. I hope you've found this review helpful.

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

What We Lose: A Novel by Zinzi Clemmons

Rating: 2.5 of 5 stars
Pages: 213 pages
Published: July 2017 

At its core, What We Lose by Zinzi Clemmons is a story about grief, depression, and healing. In this short fictional novel, Clemmons presents a story centered around Thandi, born of a South African mother and black American father, who loses her mom to cancer. The plot is Thandi working her way through this loss. She also explores seemingly unrelated themes of femininity, race, sexuality, and identity.

Clemmons has received rave reviews on her debut novel. I'm not as impressed. While there were some touching passages that resonated with me, I found the book to be very disjointed and lacking fluidity. Maybe she was trying to illustrate the emotional elements of grief through her writing. I found it very cumbersome. At times I could not tell if she was writing fiction or non-fiction. She references real life events and scientific studies like the book is a work of non-fiction, but then she has Thandi's story, which is somewhat fictional, sitting on top of the book. I say "somewhat" because she, the author, has admitted to borrowing experiences from her relationship with her own mother and using them in the novel. I know authors do this - you write what you know. I truly believe this gives the stories depth. However, in my humble opinion, Clemmons did not execute this well. I found myself re-reading passages to understand if the events she was writing about were regarding a real life person, like Nelson Mandela or Barack Obama or if she was referring to the fictional character, Thandi.

I liken the tone and pace of this book to Heart Berries by Terese Marie Mailhot. There seems to be a trend of authors writing their trauma through their books. I suppose this is a tool to heal. I just don't know if it's effective from a creative standpoint.

Recommendation This was an interesting read that I finished in about two hours. Obviously, it has resonated with many people. It just wasn't my cup of tea. The one thing I did take from it was: Love your mom while she's still here. Happy Mother's Day, Mom! :-)

Until next time ... Read on!

Regardless of whether I purchase a book, borrow a book, or receive a book in exchange for review, my ultimate goal is to be honest, fair, and constructive. I hope you've found this review helpful.

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

A Very Large Expanse of Sea by Tahereh Mafi

Rating: 5 of 5 stars
Pages: 310 pages
Published: October 2018 

A Very Large Expanse of Sea by Tahereh Mafi is a coming-of-age novel about a teen girl who happens to be Muslim and how her culture causes some uncomfortable and extremely violent reactions from people post-9/11. The book is somewhat autobiographical in that the author did experience some of the events illustrated in the novel. However, it is not an autobiography. Think of it as "inspired by" rather than a re-telling of her life. I learned about this book when Mafi spoke on a panel at the 2019 North Texas Young Adult Book Festival in March. I am glad I did.

Mafi is a storyteller. Her writing is fluid, and her prose is beautiful. In this novel, she presents some incredibly horrific events, in such a beautiful way, that captivates the reader. At its core, the book is a teen love story about the main character, Shirin, who meets her classmate, Ocean James. The two are very different but also very much drawn to each other. Mafi tells the story of their interactions and the result of those interactions from a snippet of time in their high school careers.

I think this book was very true to life, which is why I think it held my attention from page one till the very end. It was a quick and enjoyable albeit sometimes uncomfortable read. The pace and feel of it reminded me of Angie Thomas' The Hate U Give. It is so important that we all, especially young adults, have a diverse library of books from which to choose. I am thankful Mafi shared this story, and I hope she knows it does not only resonate with people from the Muslim community but other people of color as well.

Recommendation I would definitely recommend this book to young adults (late teens) of all backgrounds. We learn by reading, and there is something to be learned here. There is some language and romantic scenes, although nothing sexually explicit.

Until next time ... Read on!

Regardless of whether I purchase a book, borrow a book, or receive a book in exchange for review, my ultimate goal is to be honest, fair, and constructive. I hope you've found this review helpful.

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

The Giver by Lois Lowry

Rating: 5 of 5 stars
Pages: 208 pages
Published: January 2006 (first published in 1993)

How old am I to be reading The Giver by Lois Lowry? In my opinion, books really have no age limit. Of course, there are certain books that are not suitable for youngsters, but I believe once you've reached my age, you can read anything you want - no judgement. Having said all that, I will offer up this explanation. I decided to read this book because my 6th grade niece is reading it for her language arts class, and I love reading and discussing books with all people, but especially her!

The Giver is essentially the OG of dystopian. Before The Hunger Games, there was this lovely book. It's about a utopian society where everything is calm and peaceful. All people are respectful and follow orders. Each family unit can only have up to two children. Careers are decided by a group of leaders. The days are formulaic. Everything is gray, dull ... and boring. When the protagonist, Jonas, reaches the age of majority where he is given his job in the community, he begins to see things in a new light. His eyes are opened to a world beyond any he's ever known, and with this knowledge comes great responsibility.

I don't typically enjoy dystopian. Had I known that this was the genre, I probably would have gone into it with a different mindset. The reason I don't like reading dystopian is because of the few books I've read, it all seems hopeless and dire. I can't reconcile it with my reality, so I struggle. The difference with this book is that I do think it's filled with hope and promise. As I understand it, Lowry went on to write more books in the series. I don't know if I'll tackle those, (Although, I suppose my niece could convince me.) but I throughly enjoyed this one. Many other reviewers have balked at the ending; however this was my favorite part. I think most people either love it or hate it. If you've read The Giver or intend to, I'd love to hear your thoughts about the ending in the comments below.

Recommendation: This is a quick read for all ages. I recommend it as a nice escape from reality that evokes a myriad of emotions.

Until next time ... Read on!

Regardless of whether I purchase a book, borrow a book, or receive a book in exchange for review, my ultimate goal is to be honest, fair, and constructive. I hope you've found this review helpful.

Thursday, April 11, 2019

A River in Darkness: One Man's Escape from North Korea by Masaji Ishikawa




Rating: 4 of 5 stars 
Length: 172 pages
Published: June 2018

I received a copy of A River in Darkness: One Man's Escape from North Korea during Amazon's celebration of World Book Day in 2018. For the past couple of years Amazon has allowed users to download a select group of books for free on or about World Book Day. Those of us who read know that books can take you to faraway places, so I personally take delight this service provided by Amazon.

But back to this autobiography, the author, Masaji Ishikawa, was born in Japan of his Japanese mother and extremely abusive Korean father. While he and his sisters did experience some trials in Japan because of their socioeconomic status, it was nothing compared to the poverty, discrimination, and violence the entire family faced when his father forced them to move from Japan to North Korea. The bulk of this relatively short book is Ishikawa re-telling his formative years that include the struggles his family faced as mixed-race outsiders in both Japan then North Korea. The reader then follows the author into adulthood, where we find no shortage of struggles for this survivor. As the book title indicates, the author does eventually escape North Korea, but you'll have to read the book to find out at what cost.

This was a fairly quick read that got me out of a reading slump. Having said that, it was not an easy read. Some of the events in the book are extremely descriptive and disturbing. The book is very dark with little hope or joy. However, I do think it is well worth the read. It's important to read and learn about less than pleasant situations so we do not succumb to them. My hope and prayer, after completing this book, is that Mr. Ishikawa found peace.

Recommendation: This, like many works of non-fiction, is a necessary book. I recommend it when you are ready to take on a sobering journey.

Until next time ... Read on!

Regardless of whether I purchase a book, borrow a book, or receive a book in exchange for review, my ultimate goal is to be honest, fair, and constructive. I hope you've found this review helpful.

Saturday, March 30, 2019

Queenie by Candice Carty-Wiliams




Rating: 5 of 5 stars
Length: 330 pages
Published: March 2019


Queenie is a hot mess, but Queenie, the debut novel by Candice Carty-Williams, is a pure delight. This fictional novel published just a few weeks ago, and I was lucky enough to snag a copy from my local library shortly after publication. Queenie is the Jamaican-British protagonist of this London-set novel. As the book opens, we learn that Queenie is embarking on a break from her live-in boyfriend, Tom. She moves out of their flat, and her life subsequently begins to unravel. About halfway through the novel, she hits rock bottom and is forced to face her demons in an effort to begin a journey of self discovery and healing. 

I found Queenie very relatable in her struggles with acceptance and also quite similar to my own struggles. It's amazing how a black woman in the United States can identify with the challenges of a fictional Jamaican woman living in England. Because of her upbringing and surroundings, Queenie is constantly comparing herself to her white counterparts, dealing with thinly veiled racism in the work place and social settings, and even tolerating her white boyfriend's (Tom) racist family members. Her past, and a lot of her present, have shaped who she is and caused a callous exterior to form as an emotional coping mechanism. I think, until her turning point in the novel, she was her own worst enemy, often self-sabotaging the most important relationships in her life. 

I really enjoyed the writing, the humor, and the care that the writer took in tackling the very heavy issues of depression, panic attacks, and self-esteem. My favorite parts of the book were the WhatsApp chats between Queenie and her girlfriends. My only very minor criticism is that in flashback scenes, it was sometimes difficult to identify that it was a flashback until I was a few sentences in. 

Recommendation: I think any woman can find some of her own truth in this novel, but I think it might speak more strongly to single and dating women of color. I would definitely recommend giving it a try. This is modern fiction novel is a solid debut for Ms. Carty-Williams! 

Until next time ... Read on!


Regardless of whether I purchase a book, borrow a book, or receive a book in exchange for review, my ultimate goal is to be honest, fair, and constructive. I hope you've found this review helpful.

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Home for Erring and Outcast Girls by Julie Kibler




Rating: 5 of 5 stars
Length: 368 pages
Published: July 2019*


I was fortunate enough to be granted a digital copy of the most final proof of Home for Erring and Outcast Girls by Julie Kibler. I read Calling Me Home by this author in 2013 and thoroughly enjoyed it. I loved Home for Erring and Outcast Girls 10 times more! The book is mainly set in Arlington and Austin, Texas as well as Oklahoma. Full disclosure: Many of the scenes take place on or about the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) campus, which is my alma mater. I think this is why the book piqued my interest and resonated with me. 

This historical fiction novel is based on the actual Berachah Home for the Redemption and Protection of Erring Girls, established by Reverend James Toney and Maggie Mae Upchurch in 1903. Many of the real women whom the fictional characters are based on are buried in a cemetery on the grounds of UTA. The fictional story follows three strong female leads and their respective story lines that alternate with each chapter. In near present day, the reader first meets Cate who is a 30-something librarian at the university studying the history of the Home. Cate's story is told in present day in Arlington and flashbacks to her teenage years in Austin. Lizzie and Mattie's stories are also told at the turn of the century as residents of the Home. Over the course of the novel, we travel 30 years with Lizzie and Mattie. 

The overall theme of the book is forgiveness of self and recovery leading to personal discovery. I think the main characters in the book struggle with this as well as hesitance in letting other people get close. To be fair all of the major characters in the novel experienced some massive trauma that resulted in her respective emotional vulnerability. The author did an excellent job of illustrating these varied emotions through her descriptive language, driving tone, and exceptional prose. Some scenes made me smile while others made me cry and there was a character or two that made me angry. I really became invested in these characters, and they stuck with me long after I finished reading. 

My only critique of this story is the creative criticism of the church. I understand that this is the lens through which the author views things, and I respect it. However, it is an element that made me a little uncomfortable ... but that is what effective art does, right? It makes you dig deeper and question things, which is why reading and writing are so important to our societal growth. 

As a professional marketer, I know the greatest success is when you can drive a consumer to initiate or make a change in behavior. As a result of Kibler's beautifully told story, I have felt compelled to revisit my alma mater and seek out this hidden treasure that I'd never known until reading Home for Erring and Outcast Girls

RecommendationI really enjoyed this book and hope to get a final, hard copy upon publication to include in my home library. I think my fellow Maverick alums would also appreciate this book. If you enjoy strong female protagonists who experience personal growth or the historical fiction genre, I would strongly recommend you pick up a copy of this book when it publishes this summer.

Until next time ... Read on!


*I received an advance reading copy (ARC) of Home for Erring and Outcast Girls from NetGalley. My copy was an uncorrected digital file. Regardless of whether I purchase a book, borrow a book, or receive a book in exchange for review, my ultimate goal is to be honest, fair, and constructive. I hope you've found this review helpful.

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

On the Come Up by Angie Thomas




Rating: 3 of 5 stars
Length: 447 pages
Published: February 2019


On the Come Up by Angie Thomas is about sixteen-year old Bri, who is an aspiring rapper. Haunted by the ghost of her father's past, she is trying to make a name for herself in hopes of lifting her family above the poverty line. This young adult novel is set in the same neighborhood of Thomas' debut, The Hate U Give. As such many of the themes, dialect, and characters are similar. It is important to note that while the sophomore book tangentially touches on the first book, it is not required reading to understand the plot.

This book was a quick read about an interesting topic. I liked how Thomas demonstrated how the main character came up with her rhymes. I also think the author did a good job of illustrating the internal and external struggles that Bri faced. Some of Bri's actions and obstinance were a little frustrating, but I suspect parents of teenagers reading this book would be able to attest that her behavior was realistic (smile, parents!). 

Like the first book, I found the characters in On the Come Up to be very real, and I believe this story is another version of Thomas sharing a part of herself. However, I did not enjoy this book as much as the first. The lifestyle and struggles that the protagonist suffer are not relatable to me. Having said that, they are meaningful. Additionally, this is a young adult novel. I am not the target audience, so I don't think it's really a criticism if the book didn't move me as a mid-lifer. 

Recommendation: I find Angie Thomas to be a talented writer who, in a creative way, exposes some of her own past and vulnerabilities through her writing. This is important for young adults, and I think it would be a great read for mature teenagers, especially those who enjoy poetry and prose. Please note the book does have some violence and a fair amount of curse words.   

Until next time ... Read on!


Regardless of whether I purchase a book, borrow a book, or receive a book in exchange for review, my ultimate goal is to be honest, fair, and constructive. I hope you've found this review helpful.

Tuesday, March 12, 2019

Friday, March 8, 2019

We Cast a Shadow by Maurice Carlos Ruffin




Rating: 3 of 5 stars
Length: 336 pages
Published: January 2019


One of my books clubs chose this newly released debut, We Cast a Shadow, by Maurice Carlos Ruffin for our March monthly read. The premise was intriguing - a black father who is essentially trying to save his son from himself. In the not too distant future, as the book describes it, somewhere in the United States, race relations has taken a terrible turn from bad to worse. The unnamed narrator decides, for his son - Nigel, to reach his fullest potential he must undergo a extreme surgical procedure coined demelanization to rid himself of the dark, pigmented birthmark on his otherwise fair, biracial skin.  

The entire book is about the father doing whatever he sees fit to secure the financial means for the procedure for his son. He's in a race against himself that only he seems to be running. Against his wife's, mother's, and even his son's wishes, the narrator stops at nothing to help "protect" his son. The author does a good job building suspense and creating tension. His writing style pushes the reader forward to discover what happens next. Intertwined in this emotion are some very real scenes that reflect current racial issues, like over-policed neighborhoods of color and mass incarceration. Because the novel is set in the future, it is a bit of downer for those of us who'd like to remain optimistic that these kinds of issues will get better, not worse, with time. 

I wanted to like this book. I really did. I feel as though the author is smart and his idea was worthy of print. However, I could not get into it. I did finish the book, but it wasn't satisfying for me. These dark comedies usually aren't. I don't know if it was just so unbelievable that someone could hate the essence of their being that much or if it was the misplaced satire that turned me off. I couldn't identify with the narrator. I found him to be unsympathetic, and I think, in the end, he got everything he deserved.   

I would definitely consider reading another book by Ruffin because I do think he's a talented writer. I just think this wasn't the book for me. 

Recommendation: Fans of dystopian novels may enjoy this book. I think it's always a good idea to give new writers support. Plus, you have the added benefit of seeing them hone their craft as they publish future works.  

Until next time ... Read on!


Regardless of whether I purchase a book, borrow a book, or receive a book in exchange for review, my ultimate goal is to be honest, fair, and constructive. I hope you've found this review helpful.

Sunday, February 24, 2019

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander




Rating: 4.5 of 5 stars
Length: 13:15:00

Narrated by: Karen Chilton
Published: April 2012

I downloaded the audiobook, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, by Michelle Alexander several months ago on the recommendation of another book lover. One of my online book clubs chose it for the monthly read-along, so I began listening to the book to and from work during the month of February. 

There was a lot to digest in this book. The author takes us on a journey from slavery to present day explaining racial relations in the United States and how they have affected the legal system. Alexander presents the data in a very academic manner. I can envision this book being used as a textbook in criminal justice or psychology courses at the collegiate level. For this reason, I wish I would have purchased a physical or electronic copy so I could have highlighted and referenced some of the statistics and data she shared. 

This book was not read by the author, but the narrator did an excellent job engaging the listener with her smooth tone, using inflection at the most appropriate times.  

Do not be mislead by the title. I think the author intended to be a bit sarcastic. We do not live in a colorblind society, and I don't know that we necessarily should. However, color should not affect justice, and I think that's the point she persuasively makes in this text. I don't know that we will ever get to a place where the U.S. legal system is fair and impartial. Race will play a factor as will financial status. 

There is too much in this book to unpack in a succinct blog review. If you're interested in learning some hard truths, I would recommend this book. Be fair warned: this is not your light, beach read. 

Recommendation: This is a hard read (or listen), but it is an important one. I think it is not only important for the disenfranchised but also for the privileged. I think it could start important conversations and become the impetus for the change so vastly needed in our legal system. 

Until next time ... Read on!

Regardless of whether I purchase a book, borrow a book, or receive a book in exchange for review, my ultimate goal is to be honest, fair, and constructive. I hope you've found this review helpful.

Monday, February 18, 2019

It's Not Supposed to be This Way by Lysa TerKeurst




Rating: 5 of 5 stars
Length: 256 pages
Published: November 2018


Anyone who follows my blog writings knows that I participate in many of Proverbs 31 Ministries online Bible studies. The latest study was authored by the organization's president, Lysa TerKeurst. In It's Not Supposed to be This Way: Finding Unexpected Strength When Disappointments Leave you Shattered, TerKeurst shares her most vulnerable side with her readers as she dealt with a myriad of crises. And I say "as she dealt with" because she wrote the book, in real time, while she was in the midst of several major life upsets. Because of this I think this is her most emotional, raw, and real work to date. 

TerKeurst is a talented writer, an amazing survivor, and a strong Christ follower. Because I participated in the online Bible study I reaped the benefits of supplemental study materials. However, the book stands alone, and it effective in its own right. I did enjoy hearing and observing the author through the teaching videos, which is why I don't know why she doesn't narrate the audio version of her books. She has a lovely voice, and hearing her tell her story of transformation in her own words and her own voice is a treat.   

As always, TerKeurst reminds us that when we are at our weakest moments is when we should lean into God the most - changing our focus from the problem to our Problem Solver. 

Recommendation: I strongly recommend this book. The perspective, insight, and authenticity make the book a treasure that can be read again and again.

Until next time ... Read on!


Regardless of whether I purchase a book, borrow a book, or receive a book in exchange for review, my ultimate goal is to be honest, fair, and constructive. I hope you've found this review helpful.

Saturday, February 16, 2019

Us Against You by Fredrik Backman




Rating:  4.5 of 5 stars
Length: 448 pages

Published: June 2018

Us Against You is the second book in the series by Fredrik Backman surrounding a small, fictional hockey town in Sweden - Beartown. Beartown is the first book in the series. Us Against You picks up just a few months after the plot of Beartown. The local hockey team is the center of the town, and both the town and hockey team are trying to rebuild after a tragic event that occurred between a hockey player and the team manager's daughter. Us Against You is about this community healing and moving forward from the events of the first book.  

Us Against You is very similar to Beartown in its themes and style. They are both stories about division, hiding from oneself, and learning how to overcome the obstacle of public shame. As usual, Backman does a lovely job with his writing. He creates tension and tells a compelling story that propels the reader deep into his narrative. 

I enjoyed the second book a little more than the first because it rounds out the overall plot, ending on a hopeful note. However, I must admit, I am hoping for a third book set 10 years in the future so I can learn more about how the characters, especially the children, mature as adults. If you couldn't tell, I've become emotionally invested in these characters and their respective stories. 

This was a quick and enjoyable read. I felt it most necessary to read after completing Beartown

Recommendation: I'd definitely recommend this book to Backman fans, literary fiction readers, and if you've read Beartown you must read Us Against You.

Other Fredrik Backman books I've reviewed on A Page Before Bedtime:
Beartown

A Man Called Ove
My Grandmother Asked me to Tell You She's Sorry
Britt-Marie was Here
And Every Morning the Way Home gets Longer and Longer

Until next time ... Read on!

Regardless of whether I purchase a book, borrow a book, or receive a book in exchange for review, my ultimate goal is to be honest, fair, and constructive. I hope you've found this review helpful.

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

Mocha Girl Musings by Me!


#SheReads #SheWrites and #SheWritesSomeMore 

I've been asked to write for a very wonderful, nationwide and online book club, Mocha Girls Read. I will still be reviewing all the books I read here at A Page Before Bedtime. But I'll also be talking about some bookish things over at the Mocha Girls site. Please check out my first post, leave a comment, and maybe buy a book from there!

Until next time ... Read on!

Regardless of whether I purchase a book, borrow a book, or receive a book in exchange for review, my ultimate goal is to be honest, fair, and constructive. I hope you've found this review helpful.

Sunday, February 3, 2019

Beartown by Fredrik Backman




Rating:  4.5 of 5 stars
Length: 432 pages

Published: April 2017

Beartown by Fredrik Backman is about a fictional town in Sweden where the boy's hockey team is the nucleus of the community. The players, the staff, the parents, and the residents all are invested in the sport and the team because hockey has touched them all in some way - whether in the past or present times. And beyond hockey, there isn't much going on in this town ... until there is. A tragic decision made by the star player shatters the life of a young girl and transforms the town forever. 

Beartown is a story about division and the major events that divide families, friends, and an entire town. Backman sets up examples of this theme through the illustration of several dichotomies of character pairings. There are about two dozen characters in this book that all play a role in the book's forward-moving plot. You'd think with that many characters, the reader might get confused. Quite the contrary, the author does an excellent job of setting up the characters and the plot in the first half of the book that you, as the reader, get the feeling that he's sharing information about people who could live in your community. Backman does a superb job of developing these characters so that everyone is equally represented and their role in the story is executed perfectly. 

The only thing I did not care of in this book was the quick jumping from one character to the next as a literary device to reveal events and the timeline of the story. On many occasions the story was told in small paragraph vignettes, and I would have preferred more cohesive scenes developed within longer written passages. That is my only reason for the less than 5-star rating. 

I've read most all of Backman's novels and novellas. As usual, he won me over with his prose. He has a writing style that digs deep in my soul and hangs on tight for many days after the story ends. However, I won't have much time to recover from this one. The Beartown sequel, Us Against You, was readily available at my local library at the time I finished this book, and I've already borrowed it! 

Recommendation: Backman took on a darker topic with Beartown, but he handled it well. This story will give you all the feels. Get your copy today, and get emotionally invested in this intriguing cast of characters. 

Other Fredrik Backman books I've reviewed on A Page Before Bedtime
A Man Called Ove
My Grandmother Asked me to Tell You She's Sorry
Britt-Marie was Here
And Every Morning the Way Home gets Longer and Longer

Until next time ... Read on!

Regardless of whether I purchase a book, borrow a book, or receive a book in exchange for review, my ultimate goal is to be honest, fair, and constructive. I hope you've found this review helpful.

Thursday, January 31, 2019

Courageous Creative by Jenny Randle




Rating: 5 of 5 stars
Length: 160 pages

Published: October 2018

During the Christmas season, Facebook displayed a sponsored advertisement on my feed for Jenny Randle's Courageous Creative book and the companion online 31-day devotional study. I was intrigued, so I purchased a copy from my local Barnes & Noble reseller, signed up for the Facebook group, and eagerly awaited for January 1, 2019 when the study was scheduled to begin. 

Jenny is an Emmy award-winning creative, but moreover, she is a Christian with a genuine heart. (I feel like I really go to know her through the Facebook group, so I am referring to her by her first name in this post.) She loves the Lord, and she loves His people. In her book, she demonstrates how everyone is and can be creative through the guiding of the Holy Spirit (or as she refers to him without the article i.e., Holy Spirit.) 

Jenny has written this book in such a way that it's easy digestible. The daily content is not overwhelming and offers practical applications. Each reading has an accompanying challenge. The challenges are diverse, ranging from reading and writing to more visual tasks like drawing, coloring, and photography. The book even includes some video and voice over prompts. As you might guess from this blog, reading and writing is where I shine, so the challenges outside of those took me a little more time. There are some I still want to go back and perfect. And that's the beauty of this book is that you can pick it up at any time and revisit some of Jenny's nuggets of knowledge as well as prime your creative juices by engaging in the challenges again. 

This was a really fun devotional that allowed me to grow as a Christian and create some beautiful work. I am thankful for Jenny showing me that I was created to create by the Ultimate Creator. 

Recommendation: This book would be a great study for a small group with your church. Whether you participate in this interactive devotional with a group, like I did, or take on the challenges on your own, I am certain you will be motivated and blessed by Jenny's work. She truly is a courageous creative! Visit Jenny online and connect with her on all social media platforms. 

Until next time ... Read on!

Regardless of whether I purchase a book, borrow a book, or receive a book in exchange for review, my ultimate goal is to be honest, fair, and constructive. I hope you've found this review helpful.




Monday, January 28, 2019

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens




Rating: 4.5+ of 5 stars
Length: 325 pages

Published: August 2018

The majority of the members in my bookish groups had been telling me to run, not walk, to the nearest library or bookstore and get Delia Owens' Where the Crawdads Sing. As luck would have it, I was able to get on the list at my local library and the ebook became available ... about six hours before Fredrik Backman's Beartown also became available, so I dug in right away. 

Where the Crawdads Sing is a coming of age story about Kya Clark who, at a young age, was abandoned by her family. We learn of her tale of survival through a chronological telling from age 6 through young adulthood. The book's setting alternates between this historical, biographical backdrop in the 1950s and 1960s and a more present day decade of the 1970s. In this more recent timeline, the reader learns that Chase Andrews, the town's heartthrob, has been found dead and probably murdered. From there, the story vacillates between the two time periods until they converge on the pinnacle point of the mysterious death. 

This story has everything: great writing, a compelling plot, mystery, suspense, and romance. Ms. Owens is a talented writer creating powerful imagery of the marsh and swamplands of the North Carolina coast. She does such a great job depicting scenes in her novel that I felt like I was there. Owens writes in such a way that the reader can't help but be transported to the very time and place in which she is describing. This book and this author's writing is a true illustration of what readers mean when they say books can take you places you've never been before. Additionally, the suspenseful elements of the book propel the reader forward. The book had a little bit of a slow start for me (hence the rating just shy of 5 stars), but the momentum quickly picked up and didn't let me go until the surprising, plot twist-filled conclusion. 

Recommendation: I was pressed for time on this book because I needed to get to my next ebook loan; however, I suspect that I would have devoured it without a deadline just the same. Do yourself a favor and travel to North Carolina through Ms. Owens' words. Run, don't walk, and pick up a copy of Where the Crawdads Sing today! 

Until next time ... Read on!

Regardless of whether I purchase a book, borrow a book, or receive a book in exchange for review, my ultimate goal is to be honest, fair, and constructive. I hope you've found this review helpful.